Few and far antiques – Few And Far http://fewandfar.net/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 17:00:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fewandfar.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Few and far antiques – Few And Far http://fewandfar.net/ 32 32 Antiques Roadshow Experts Baffled As Guest ‘With More Money Than Common Sense’ REFUSES To Sell Item https://fewandfar.net/antiques-roadshow-experts-baffled-as-guest-with-more-money-than-common-sense-refuses-to-sell-item/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 14:08:29 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/antiques-roadshow-experts-baffled-as-guest-with-more-money-than-common-sense-refuses-to-sell-item/

Experts at ANTIQUES Roadshow have been left baffled after a guest refused to sell John Lennon’s old door number – despite its staggering valuation.

The man took the plaque – which bore the number 251 – when the show traveled to Liverpool, where the Beatles formed in the 60s.

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A guest on Antiques Roadshow had an old door number that belonged to John LennonCredit: BBC
The owner was told that the door number could be worth a lot

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The owner was told that the door number could be worth a lotCredit: BBC

There were gasps in the crowd when he said it was the door number to the late star’s childhood home.

And people were even more shocked when antiques expert Raj Bisram told him the few could ‘easily’ fetch an incredible five to eight thousand pounds at a specialist souvenir sale.

“But it could double that, it could double that, it could really double that,” exclaimed Raj.

The owner explained that his uncle owned the property at some point after the Lennon family sold it.

He added that he was then “one of the few Beatles fans to have walked into the house for about 36 years”.

“When he was making changes to the door, he gave me the old license plate,” he said.

Clearly excited, Raj said: “It’s an iconic thing, you know, we’re talking about one of the biggest bands in the world.

“It’s the house number, it’s a great article.”

However, the man said he doubted he would ever sell the piece as he just liked having it in the family.

Viewers were stunned when the article was rated.

Referring to Lennon’s famous song, one quipped: “Imagine £5,000-8,000 for John Lennon’s original house number, might even be double that.”

Echoing their comments, someone else said, “Want to keep an old door number knowing it’s worth thousands.”

While a third added: “What a lucky man he has such a famous door number. Just sell it man!”

Antiques Roadshow is available to watch on BBC iPlayer.

The number was on John Lennon's door

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The number was on John Lennon’s doorCredit: BBC

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Horses and heritage on the farm: Yenke Peddler antiques https://fewandfar.net/horses-and-heritage-on-the-farm-yenke-peddler-antiques/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/horses-and-heritage-on-the-farm-yenke-peddler-antiques/

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Traveling south to Mansfield this weekend will bring you back to a bit of historical significance.

Heritage Days at Malabar Farm State Park runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Free admission to this 18th-century living history camp includes Civil War demonstrations, crafts, antiques, and wagon rides.

Refreshments are cash only, so plan ahead – no cards will be accepted.

Malabar Farm was built in 1929 by author Louis Bromfield, who dubbed it the “Big House.” The 32-room mansion was done in the Greek Revival style. It has a festive air because in 1945, Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Becall got married there and stayed there for their honeymoon!

Malabar Farm also introduced sustainable agriculture, which fits perfectly with our modern thinking on conservation. Indeed, Heritage Days are devoted to the recognition of the past and the construction of future ideas. This year marks the 45th celebration.

In addition to life on the farm, horses play a central role in the world of collectors. Horse miniatures are the most common, with Lladro or Breyers landing in distinctive winner circles.

The famous Kentucky Derby is known for its own niche of highly sought-after items, including the specialty glasses made every year.

Nineteenth-century horse-drawn toys include pewter and cast-iron examples. The most valuable are the original oil paintings worthy of a museum.

Hi Brenda,

I have a Goebel porcelain horse, measuring 9 by 10 inches. It has the silver paper tag that reads W. Germany. As a horse lover, it has pride of place in my cabinet of curiosities. Do they still retain their value?

LK

Hi Lisa,

Your Goebel horse is a thoroughbred! The popular German company that also made Hummel figurines also produced remarkable animals. The equestrian theme is always popular and reliable for collectors. West Germany was a specific time period — 1949-1990 — so the value would be $85.

If you have an item to appraise, send a clear photo with history to Yenke Peddler, Brenda Yenke, PO Box 361633, Strongsville, Ohio, 44136. You can also send photos and inquiries for Brenda to appraise at kenyenke@aol.com.

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Badges aren’t just for sheriffs https://fewandfar.net/badges-arent-just-for-sheriffs/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 13:06:04 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/badges-arent-just-for-sheriffs/

Palm Springs is a car city and the Coachella Valley is full of cars. Look at all the car auctions, dealerships, shows and even race tracks we have here. Old cars are great too, with all the accessories that come with them. Muscle cars of the 1950s and 1960s have long overshadowed pre-war classics in popularity, but it’s not uncommon to see a handful of both rolling along Route 111 on any given day.

Not surprisingly, we in the antiques business sell all the vintage car stuff we can get and are always looking for more. Among the most popular artifacts are car badges. Let’s take a short drive down the path of history.

In fact, the name “car badges” is a bit vague. Hood ornaments sometimes fall into this category, as do make and model plates that often adorn the back of a car. Back when radiator caps were located outside the engine compartment, manufacturers knew that above these caps would be a great place to promote their brands. Some rose to fame like the Bentley “Flying B” while others like Jaguar eventually decided their leaping cat was an unwanted speed bump for their sleek designs and scrapped them.

The famous Rolls Royce Spirit of Ecstasy bonnet ornament is said to have originated from an illicit affair between a Rolls owner and a British actress.

The growing popularity of these ornaments has also spurred an increase in thefts, prompting many manufacturers to incorporate their logos elsewhere.

Even more interesting is the origin of many automotive logos. Alfa Romeo’s logo includes a number of historic Italian elements, while Audi’s four interlocking rings represent the 1932 merger of four of Germany’s major automakers. BMW’s logo is derived from the Bavarian flag and Cadillac’s began as a take-off from the Cadillac family coat of arms. The Prancing Horse Ferrari was inspired by an Italian fighter pilot who flew with a similar crest on his plane and felt it brought him good luck. Although the origin of many other logos is a bit fuzzier, you can find everything you want to know about your own car logo with a quick search online.

The fenders adorning a Bentley badge reflect the company's origins as an aircraft engine builder.

As with other car badges, there is a whole range that has nothing to do with car manufacturers. Many were originally designed to be affixed to a car’s grille to give names to car clubs, rallies, military service and places of interest. A good number of these were beautifully crafted to the finest detail with colored enamel, and it was not uncommon for a well-traveled vehicle to have a grille full of badging. Just as hikers and climbers often attached badges to their trekking poles indicating the regions visited and the mountains conquered, so did the automobile enthusiasts who took their cars on tour. For those who stayed closer to home, their auto grills may feature American Legion, Masonic, or VFW badges, all colorful and well-made.

If you’re a classic car enthusiast but maybe don’t have the space or the wallet for a car, researching and collecting car badges is a fun way to go; eBay is full of them, and they’re often featured at car shows and car museums.

After World War II, number plates were also popular for a time, mainly in England, where they promoted automobile associations and clubs. Prices range from a few dollars to several hundred, but it doesn’t take a fortune to build a credible collection. And what the hell; maybe your own car could use a little bling too.

Mike Rivkin and his wife, Linda, are longtime residents of Rancho Mirage. For many years he was an award-winning catalog editor and authored seven books, as well as countless articles. Now he is the owner of the Palm Springs Antique Galleries. His antiquities column appears on Sundays in The Desert Sun. Want to send Mike a question about antiques? Write to him at info@silverfishpress.com.

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Antiques Roadshow expert Marc Allum at the Isle of Wight Arts Society talk https://fewandfar.net/antiques-roadshow-expert-marc-allum-at-the-isle-of-wight-arts-society-talk/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 04:03:41 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/antiques-roadshow-expert-marc-allum-at-the-isle-of-wight-arts-society-talk/ The new season of the IW Arts Society will be launched with the visit of Marc Allumfamous for his many appearances on the BBC Antiques Tour.

He has been a BBC Antiques Roadshow miscellaneous specialist since 1998 and has appeared on numerous television and radio programmes.

Marc has his own unique style with interests ranging from prehistoric to modern design and is an avowed collector.

It will take members and visitors behind the scenes of the UK’s best-loved antiques fair and discuss some of the most intriguing, enigmatic and valuable finds of recent decades.

The first conference of the new season will take place at Northwood House, Cowes on Tuesday 27 September at 2.15pm.

Each month, the society will host top experts in their fields, to give illustrated talks on a wide variety of fine art topics, including painting, sculpture, music and history.

Membership in the Society is now open.

Application forms are available from www.theartssocietyisleofwight.org.uk

There are a limited number of places for visitors, for £10 per person, but booking must be made in advance at info@theartssocietyisleofwight.org.uk

There is a special membership offer this month.

Most conferences are now also streamed on Zoom, for members who cannot attend in person.

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Classic bottles celebrated, new discoveries discovered https://fewandfar.net/classic-bottles-celebrated-new-discoveries-discovered/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 19:04:19 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/classic-bottles-celebrated-new-discoveries-discovered/

The top lot of the sale was this rare historic “Tippecanoe” – “North Bend” cabin bottle, likely Mount Vernon Glass Works, Vernon, NY, circa 1840, which fetched $47,970, near the top of its estimate.

Review by WA Demers, Photos Courtesy Norman C. Heckler & Company

WOODSTOCK VALLEY, CONN. – Norman Heckler showcased more than 70 prime examples of glass bottles at his company’s Premier Auction 210, an online sale that ran Aug. 17-31. The sale totaled $472,680 with just two lots passed and between 150 and 200 registered bidders participating on Heckler’s own platform.

Among the famous classics and new discoveries was a historic Masonic hourglass-shaped vial that sold for $19,890 to a private collector. Probably from Coventry Glass Works, Coventry, Conn., 1815-1830, the half-pint GIV-29 bottle featured a light olive yellow coloration, a sheared mouth and a pontil scar. Its bright, clear color, heavy embossing, and extremely rare and fine condition made it very desirable. These were the former McBaron Collection and the Jay and Maxine Jacobs Collection, West Coast collectors who have been acquiring rare and desirable bottles for decades.

According to the Virtual Museum of Historical Bottles and Glass, the first American Mason Lodge was established in Philadelphia in 1730, and future revolutionary leader Benjamin Franklin was a founding member. George Washington joined Freemasonry in the lodge in Fredericksburg, Virginia when he was 20 years old.

Most Masonic flasks were made between the 1810s and 1830s in the United States when American Freemasonry, considered both a fraternal and patriotic organization, was at its zenith. During this period, it was not uncommon for Masonic lodges to meet in local taverns or in halls hired for the occasion. After the meeting, the brethren usually met for a “festive council” or collation, during which toasts were offered and libations consumed. As likely as not, Masonic flasks came into use around this time and some of these examples could have been on tables, full of spirits to stimulate dialogue, conversation and fellowship.

This historic Masonic hourglass-shaped flask, which sold for $19,890, probably came from Coventry Glass Works, Coventry, Conn., 1815-1830. The half-pint GIV-29 bottle exhibited a light olive yellow coloring and extremely rare strong embossing. Ex McBaron Collection and Jay and Maxine Jacobs Collection, it was one of the Masonic flasks mostly made between the 1810s and 1830s in the United States at the height of American Freemasonry.

The top lot of the sale was a figurative example, a historic “Tippencanoe” – “North Bend” cabin bottle, probably Mount Vernon Glass Works, Vernon, NY, circa 1840, which fetched $47,970, near the top of its estimate, going to a west coast collector. Log cabin shaped, medium to dark forest green, the pint-plus bottle featured an applied slant-neck mouth with ring, tubular pontil scar, and a 1/8-inch hole in one corner of the base. GVII-1, it has been described as “historically significant and impressive”, one of the few known examples.

Rara Avis, a batch that was not a bottle but a three-mold blown bowl, fetched $33,930. It was a bright yellow green with an outward machined rim, made by Kent Glass Works, Portage County, Ohio, 1825-1835. At 2-7/8 inches high and 8 inches in diameter, it was in good condition. Heckler said there could only be three known examples.

“EG Booz’s Old Cabin Whiskey” was made for Edmund G. Booz by the Whitney Glass Works of Glassboro, NJ, circa 1860-70. At his death, Booz is said to have had 25 cases of Cabin Whiskey in stock, worth $6 a case or 50 cents a bottle, and the famous bottle has been widely reproduced. At 2022 auction prices, this cabin-shaped bottle of amber, with an applied angled-neck mouth and smooth base fetched $31,590. It was 7½ inches tall and retained about 75% of its original wrapper around the label, which Heckler says is “where rare bottles and ephemera meet.” It was the old Robert Heath collection, the Jay and Maxine Jacobs collection.

Washington-Eagle portrait bottles continue to show market strength, with an example probably by Bridgeton Glass works, Bridgeton, NJ, 1836-55, selling at $21,060, more than triple its high estimate. The lime-green bottle had an overall olive tone with what the catalog described as “severe citron influence”, resulting in a rare color. It was discovered a few years ago in a ship’s captain in Nantucket. Beautiful extremely rare color.

“EG Booz’s Old Cabin Whiskey” was made for Edmund G. Booz by the Whitney Glass Works of Glassboro, NJ, circa 1860-70. This cabin-shaped amber bottle, with an applied angled-neck mouth and smooth base, fetched $31,590.

“Success to the Railroad” proclaimed historic flask by the Lancaster Glass Works, Lancaster, NY, 1849-60. Formerly in the collection of Judge Ed Mackenzie and the Jay and Maxine Jacobs collection, the pint bottle was sapphire blue, with an inwardly rolled mouth and a tubular pontil scar, earning $17,550, an estimate more than twice as high.

For $11,115 there was another historic Masonic flask, this one a “JKB” Masonic Eagle made by Keene Marlboro Street Glassworks, Keene, NH, 1815-30. With heavy embossing and a rare Prussian blue color, it belonged to the Jay and Maxine Jacobs collection.

Representing just a good old American cylindrical bottle, an “Old Virginia Peach Brandy” bottle, 1845-60, had recently been found in New Jersey. It was dandelion honey yellow with olive undertones, with an applied slant neck mouth with an iron ring and pontil mark, measuring 12½ inches high. Its fine condition brought it to $10,530, an estimate twice as high.

Other notable Eagle flasks included a “New London Glass Works” Eagle quart and historic anchor flask, New London, Conn., 1860-66, yellow with acacia honey tone, applied double neck mouth and a smooth base from the Jay and Maxine Jacobs collection, which edged closer to its high estimate at $9,945; a rare historical half pint Double Eagle flask, Coventry Glass Works, Coventry, Connecticut, 1830-48, in a bright lime/light lime green, possibly one of three known and discovered several years ago at a Connecticut flea market, which was bid twice its high estimate at $8,190; and from the Midwest, a historic Double Eagle pint bottle, 1830-1860, in deep aquamarine, which left the gallery at $4,680. Ex Paul Richards collection and Jay and Maxine Jacobs collection, it was extremely rare with three or four known examples.

A three-mold soufflé bowl fetched $33,930. It was a bright yellow green with an outward machined rim, made by Kent Glass Works, Portage County, Ohio, 1825-1835. There are possibly only three known examples, according to Norman Heckler.

Two scrolling flasks were among the highlights. One with an anchor roller and fleur-de-lys flask, possibly made by John Robinson and Son Manufacturers, Pittsburgh, Penn., 1830-1834, was ice blue and sold for $8,190. The other was an American example, 1845-60, moonstone with a pink cast, a rare and unusual color. It made $4,095 and was one of Heckler’s favorite items in the sale, comparing its pearly white color to the clambroth glass typically associated with Cape Cod glass.

Another recent discovery came in the form of “Dr JB Henion’s Sure Cure For Malaria”, a brilliant sapphire blue medicine bottle, circa 1885, with a large applied “mushroom” mouth and smooth base. Standing 5½ inches tall, it had recently been unearthed in Connecticut and fetched $5,850.

The Jay and Maxine Jacobs Collection also provided a sunburst bottle from Keene Marlboro Street Glassworks, Keene, NH, 1815-25. In light medium green with a sheared mouth and pontil scar, half-pint flask color and crisp mold print brought it to $3,803.

The prices shown include the buyer’s commission as quoted by the auction house. For information, www.hecklerauction.com or 860-974-1634.

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Kovel’s Antiques and Collecting: Clean Antique Oil Lamps Before Use | Lifestyles https://fewandfar.net/kovels-antiques-and-collecting-clean-antique-oil-lamps-before-use-lifestyles/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 06:40:00 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/kovels-antiques-and-collecting-clean-antique-oil-lamps-before-use-lifestyles/

Q: I have an old oil lamp that I keep as a decoration, but I’m wondering how to use it in case I lose power during a storm. Is it safe? Or will it damage the antique or create a fire hazard?

A: If you want to use an antique oil lamp, make sure it is clean and that none of its parts are missing or damaged. Choose your fuel carefully; each type of oil lamp is designed for a specific type of fuel. What is sold as “lamp oil” is purified kerosene, so it is safe for kerosene lamps. You can find commercial lamp oils with added colorings or fragrances, but we don’t recommend them. They can damage your lamp or leave stains. Keep the lamp and its fuel out of the reach of children or pets. Use a wick long enough to keep the flame from reaching the oil. Treat the lamp like a lighted candle or any other open flame. Do not use it in an area where you have detected gas. Use it in a well-ventilated room and keep it on a firm surface where it won’t be bumped or knocked over.

There are several clubs for antique lamp collectors and businesses that repair and restore oil lamps or sell spare parts. Many are listed in the Kovels.com business directory. They often have detailed instructions and safety precautions for using oil lamps.

Q: I have a letter signed by Paul Franke and Dr. Reinhold Heidecke, the founders of the company that produced the Rollei and Rolleiflex cameras. He congratulates the buyer of the TLR camera. The letter is in German and has no date. Can you tell me when this letter could have been written? I don’t want to sell it but I’m curious if it has any value.

A: The Rollei optical instrument company was founded in 1920 by Paul Franke and Dr. Reinhold Heidecke in Braunschweig, Germany. The camera had two separate lenses: one for the view and one for taking the picture. Their Rolleiflex TLR (twin lens reflex) camera was sold in 1929. Paul Franke died in 1950. The letter should have been written between 1929 and 1950. Letters signed by famous people are collectible and valuable. The letter might be of interest to camera collectors and camera historians if it is an authentic letter and not an advertising piece. An authentic letter would probably have a date. You may need to take it to an autograph expert to determine the value.

Q: My grandmother loved the Precious Moments figurines. She gave me the Precious Moments figurine of a bride called “Someday My Love” when I got married 20 years ago. Is it worth anything?

A: Precious Moments, like Beanie Babies, were extremely popular and people collected them assuming they would increase in value. Most did not. Artist and illustrator Samuel Butcher began drawing pictures of stylized, cute children in the 1970s. He and a friend started a business to make and sell greeting cards and posters featuring his artwork ‘Precious Moments». In 1978, Enesco Corp. has developed a range of Precious Moments porcelain figurines. The demand was high. Sales kept growing, too many different figurines were made, and the market collapsed. Many buyers still like them, but they are selling at very low prices. Your “Someday My Love” figurine was made in 1988. It sells for between 14 and 25 dollars.

Q: I have a whole set of blue Currier & Ives platters, platters, bowls and serving pieces. I am now drawn to Currier & Ives pink sets. What can you tell me about them?

A: During the 1950s, the Currier & Ives model from Royal China was offered as a premium in A&P and Winn-Dixie stores. They can now be found in virtually all shopping malls and thrift stores. Their prices are starting to climb, so buying a complete set becomes expensive – at least $10 a dish, and the same for bowls and serving pieces. Currier & Ives pieces were produced until the closure of the Royal China Company in 1986. Most Currier & Ives sets are blue, as you mentioned. In addition to the rarer pink, you can also find green and brown-on-white sets. The rarest colors are more expensive.

TIP: Don’t store vintage fabrics in unheated attics or basements or in areas that are likely to get hot. The best storage is between 65 and 75 degrees.

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Kovels Antiques: Original Rolls Royce Hood Ornament – Flying Lady – would fetch a pretty penny | Home & Garden https://fewandfar.net/kovels-antiques-original-rolls-royce-hood-ornament-flying-lady-would-fetch-a-pretty-penny-home-garden/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/kovels-antiques-original-rolls-royce-hood-ornament-flying-lady-would-fetch-a-pretty-penny-home-garden/

Terry and Kim Kovel King Features Syndicate

Fancy a bit of luxury? This “Spirit of Ecstasy” figurine reproduces the hood ornament of Rolls-Royce cars. In 1909, car enthusiast John Douglas-Scott-Montagu commissioned sculptor Charles Sykes to create a mascot for his Rolls-Royce.

Sykes made a sculpture of a woman bent at the waist, leaning forward so that her dress flutters behind her like wings. The model was Eleanor Thornton, Montagu’s secretary and, secretly, lover.

In 1911, Sykes’ sculpture became Rolls-Royce’s official hood ornament. “Spirit of Ecstasy” is its official name, but it is also known as “Flying Lady” or “Silver Lady”.

The hood ornament was originally silver, but has since been made in other silver metals like chrome or stainless steel.

This brass version is a reproduction. It sold for $210 at Morphy Auctions – a very low price compared to an actual Rolls-Royce car.

People also read…

Q: I have an old oil lamp that I keep as a decoration, but I’m wondering how to use it in case I lose power during a storm. Is it safe? Or will it damage the antique or create a fire hazard?

A: If you want to use an antique oil lamp, make sure it is clean and that none of its parts are missing or damaged.

Choose your fuel carefully; each type of oil lamp is designed for a specific type of fuel. What is sold as “lamp oil” is purified kerosene, so it is safe for kerosene lamps. You can find commercial lamp oils with added colorings or fragrances, but we don’t recommend them. They can damage your lamp or leave stains.

Keep the lamp and its fuel out of the reach of children or pets. Use a wick long enough to keep the flame from reaching the oil. Treat the lamp like a lighted candle or any other open flame. Do not use it in an area where you have detected gas. Use it in a well-ventilated room and keep it on a firm surface where it won’t be bumped or knocked over.

There are several clubs for antique lamp collectors and businesses that repair and restore oil lamps or sell spare parts. Many are listed in the Kovels.com business directory. They often have detailed instructions and safety precautions for using oil lamps.

Q: I have a letter signed by Paul Franke and Dr. Reinhold Heidecke, the founders of the company that produced the Rollei and Rolleiflex cameras. He congratulates the buyer of the TLR camera. The letter is in German and has no date. Can you tell me when this letter could have been written? I don’t want to sell it but I’m curious if it has any value.

A: The Rollei optical instrument company was founded in 1920 by Paul Franke and Dr. Reinhold Heidecke in Braunschweig, Germany. The camera had two separate lenses: one for the view and one for taking the picture. Their Rolleiflex TLR (twin lens reflex) camera was sold in 1929. Paul Franke died in 1950. The letter should have been written between 1929 and 1950.

Letters signed by famous people are collectible and treasured. The letter might be of interest to camera collectors and camera historians if it is an authentic letter and not an advertising piece. An authentic letter would probably have a date. You may need to take it to an autograph expert to determine the value.

Q: My grandmother loved the Precious Moments figurines. She gave me the Precious Moments figurine of a bride called “Someday My Love” when I got married 20 years ago.

A: Precious Moments, like Beanie Babies, were extremely popular and people collected them assuming they would increase in value. Most did not.

Artist and illustrator Samuel Butcher began drawing pictures of stylized, cute children in the 1970s. He and a friend started a business to make and sell greeting cards and posters featuring his artwork ‘Precious Moments”. In 1978, Enesco Corp. has developed a range of Precious Moments porcelain figurines.

Demand was high. Sales kept growing, too many different figurines were made, and the market collapsed. Many buyers still like them, but they are selling at very low prices. Your “Someday My Love” figurine was made in 1988. It sells for between 14 and 25 dollars.

Q: I have a whole set of blue Currier & Ives platters, platters, bowls and serving pieces. I am now drawn to Currier & Ives pink sets. What can you tell me about them?

A: During the 1950s, the Currier & Ives model from Royal China was offered as a premium in A&P and Winn-Dixie stores. They can now be found in virtually all shopping malls and thrift stores.

Their prices are starting to climb, so buying a complete set becomes expensive – at least $10 a dish, and the same for bowls and serving pieces. Currier & Ives pieces were produced until the closure of the Royal China Company in 1986.

Most Currier & Ives sets are blue, as you mentioned. In addition to the rarer pink, you can also find green and brown-on-white sets. The rarest colors are more expensive.

Current prices

Current prices are recorded from antique shows, flea markets, sales and auctions across the United States. Prices vary by location due to local economic conditions.

Toy, puppet, penguin, gray beak and feet, wears red jacket, black and white checkered shirt, poseable, Dee Segula, 20th century, 9 inches by 5½ inches, $60.

Silver, bonbonniere, Arts and Crafts, hinged handle, pierced, four angled scrollwork around edge, hand-hammered, R. Wallace & Sons, 19th century, 5 inches, diameter, $75.

Limoges porcelain bowl, white flowers, gold rim, short neck, shoulders, 8½ by 12 inches, $190.

Lamp, oil, chinoiserie, opaque glass, white, double calabash shape, painted leafy and fruiting branches, mounted as a table lamp, 22 x 6 inches, the pair, $255.

Brass, wall sculpture, musical notation, treble clef, curved staff, black metal, modernist, signed, C. Jere, 1988, 24 x 60 inches, $280.

Cabinet, desk, neoclassical, Hollywood Regency, oak, black lacquer, cream leather writing surface, three of two drawers, knee hole, tapered legs, Baker Furniture Co., 29 x 46 x 23 inches, $310.

Advertisement, display, Crayola crayons, box, open rounded top, eight crayons inside, yellow and green exterior, painted, wood, 78 x 42 inches, $510.

Hutschenreuther figurine, tiger, front paw outstretched, head up, tail down, porcelain, 10½ x 22½ inches, $810.

Book, An Historical Atlas, Edward Quin, 21 maps, fold-out, aquatints, engraved, hand-coloured, RB Seeley & W. Burnside, London, 1836, $1,170.

Blanket, wearing, Navajo, female, red field, seven black and yellow wave stripes, red and white triangular border, 1900s, 80 by 51 inches, $3,445.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question and a photo, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or e-mail addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included we will try. The amount of mail makes responses or personal assessments impossible. Write to Kovels, King Features Syndicate, 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, Fla. 32803.

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Camilla filmed the “Antiques Roadshow” episode at the Eden Project https://fewandfar.net/camilla-filmed-the-antiques-roadshow-episode-at-the-eden-project/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 11:48:33 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/camilla-filmed-the-antiques-roadshow-episode-at-the-eden-project/

The Duchess of Cornwall (left) with BBC presenter Fiona Bruce during a visit to the Antiques tour at the Eden Project. (PENNSYLVANIA)

The Duchess of Cornwall filmed an upcoming episode of Antiques tour to the Eden Project, bringing with her two objects to evaluate.

Camilla has visited Cornwall’s well-known biome greenhouses and the treasures she has brought for appraisal will be revealed when the episode airs on BBC One next year.

Read more: who is still in Famous celebrity chef?

She took part in the ‘Guess the Mystery Object’ quiz with jewelry expert Geoffrey Munn, and strolled through the famous gardens of The Eden Project with the show’s presenter Fiona Bruce.

Bruce, who presented Antiques tour since 2008, the host has said the Duchess is a “good sportswoman” who “has the full roadshow experience”.

The Duchess of Cornwall during a visit to the Eden Project antiques fair in Bodelva, Cornwall.  Picture date: Tuesday September 6, 2022.

Camilla was said to be a “good sportswoman” that day. (PENNSYLVANIA)

“I think the Duchess really enjoyed visiting the presentation tour. She was such a good sportswoman and spoke to many of our visitors here, the crew and our specialists,” she said.

“She brought a few items, and our bookseller and silver specialist told her about them. So I’d say she had the full presentation tour experience – this is the last program we are filming this year and what a wonderful way to end with such a special guest.

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Camilla later met Dylan Kilpatrick, 16, and his mother Amanda Fishlock, from Cornwall, who had brought a painting by their ancestor, 19th century artist Robert Ponsonby Staples, of a family on a boating outing of sea.

When asked what Camilla thought of the painting, Dylan replied: “She said she was jealous, she said she really liked the figure in the foreground.”

The Duchess of Cornwall (left) with BBC presenter Fiona Bruce during a visit to the antiques fair at the Eden Project in Bodelva, Cornwall.  Picture date: Tuesday September 6, 2022.

Camilla and Fiona Bruce visited the famous Eden Project sites. (PENNSYLVANIA)

Camilla also spoke with Sandra Matthews, 77, who brought a prayer book she said once belonged to famous 19th century French actress Sarah de Bernhardt.

“Camilla was really interested because she knew who Sarah de Bernhardt was,” Matthews said.

Elsewhere, Camilla met the former cabinetmaker Christopher Thorp, who had a book of furniture prices printed by the London Cabinet Makers Union in 1811.

Thorp, who has since retrained as a tropical ecologist working for the University of Plymouth, said the Duchess asked him about his former profession and his interest in the craft’s history.

Antiques tour returned to BBC One for a new series on Sunday, with a guest bringing a pair of Queen Victoria trousers to review.

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Antiques Roadshow guest speechless on Gazza snap evaluation | Television & Radio | Showbiz and television https://fewandfar.net/antiques-roadshow-guest-speechless-on-gazza-snap-evaluation-television-radio-showbiz-and-television/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 03:58:00 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/antiques-roadshow-guest-speechless-on-gazza-snap-evaluation-television-radio-showbiz-and-television/

Antiques Roadshow is a BBC favorite and in a classic clip from Wollaton Hall, expert Raj Bisram shared his thoughts on a guest’s signed photo. Former footballers Vinnie Jones and Paul Gascoigne appear in the image which has become one of the most famous photos in football history. The guest was surprised to learn that the photo could be worth thousands of pounds at auction.

Antiques Roadshow expert Raj couldn’t contain his excitement when he saw the black and white shot of Jones and Gascoigne.

The photo showed Jones grabbing Gazza’s groin as he tried to fend off the attacking midfielder.

“What an iconic photograph you brought,” Raj told his guest, who had a personal connection to the photo.

The guest shared, “I was the referee for that game, it was on my birthday, pretty funny.

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“It was a Premier League match between Wimbledon and Newcastle United.”

“I have to admit I didn’t see that incident,” he laughed as the pundit watched Jones’ unfortunate hand positioning.

“I mean, if you had seen this incident, obviously you would have booked Vinnie Jones, huh?” He asked.

The referee agreed, saying, “I suppose that would be uncourteous conduct.”

Jones said: “As a Newcastle free-kick was taken, I didn’t want Gazza to go forward for the ball.

“As we were jostling, he suddenly said to me, ‘You make your £100 today.’

“It was meant to be an insult, so I just grabbed it by the you-know-what and it was perfect. There was no mess.

“It was straight on the button and I didn’t let go.

“The game ended 0-0 so I guess everyone was happy the grab happened because there wasn’t much else to talk about.”

Antiques Roadshow airs Sundays at 8pm on BBC One.

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The rise and fall of basket weaving in the Pima culture https://fewandfar.net/the-rise-and-fall-of-basket-weaving-in-the-pima-culture/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 13:05:12 +0000 https://fewandfar.net/the-rise-and-fall-of-basket-weaving-in-the-pima-culture/

The other day, one of our regular customers who loves extravagant costumes came in and admired a newly displayed Native American war shirt. Not so long ago he would have bought it without a second thought. This time, however, he mumbled something about “cultural appropriation” and moved on.

Having never heard of cultural appropriation, I was a bit confused. Can we no longer take our hat off to regional or historical fashion? Does that mean I now have to throw away all my Hawaiian shirts? I’m still chewing on that idea, but in the meantime, this column pays homage to a non-portable icon of Southwestern history: the Pima basket.

The Pima are a community of Native Americans who lived (and still live) just east of us in southern Arizona. Descended from the ancient Hohokum tribe, they were river dwellers and able to use their proximity to the then-flowing Salt and Gila rivers for farming.